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Melbourne 'W Class' Tram
Melbourne's iconic 'W Class' Tram

Melbourne without trams is unthinkable!

It has come close at times over the last 100 years, but the forces of good, righteousness and the Melbourne Way have prevailed.

Sydney had trams once. In fact the expression shot through like a Bondi tram has entered the language. But they sold out to modernism and the international movement. Those ideas and books took longer to get to Melbourne.

We certainly had a good attempt at destroying our heritage in the name of modernism for the Olympic Games in 1956, but anachronisms like the trams and the Exhibition Buildings managed to survive because they were just too bloody useful.

The Melbourne W-class tram is an engineering classic. It is simple, highly efficient and economical, and just keeps on going year after year. It is little surprise to know that it is classified by the National Trust.



Colonial Tramcar Restaurant

Colonial Tramcar Restaurant

 

Some suggested tram journeys:

 

 

 

 

'Toast Rack' Tram
Historic 'Toast Rack' Tram

Unfortunately, although trams appear on the surface to be 'clean and green', the story is not quite as simple on closer investigation. You can find more reflections at Green Issues in Melbourne in our newsletter No.45 of 3rd April 200

Some related links

 

 

Melbourne trams
Click here to buy this print online

Recommended books

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Melbourne Tram Museum

This museum is a short tram ride from the city and contains a significant collection of heritage trams in the historic Hawthorn Tram Depot. It is open on the second Saturday of each month a month. More information >>
Second Saturday of the month

 

Hawthorn Tram Depot, cnr Power Street & Riverdale Road - Hawthorn
Enquiries: (03) 9619 8863

The White Hat Quiz

  1. Until well into the 20th century, the road space between tram tracks and to a certain distance either side was filled red gum blocks, and you can still find some examples remaining around Melbourne. The red gum was used even though cement and asphalt were readily available and in common use. There is a very good reason for their use. What was the reason for using red gum blocks and where can you see remaining examples of these blocks?

You can find many more questions like this at The White Hat Quiz.


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